Lower Gastro-Intestinal Cancer

Clinical trials for patients with cancers of the lower part of the digestive system. This includes bowel, colon and rectum.

If you would like to be considered for a clinical trial you will require a referral from your current treating team. Visit the Joining a Clinical Trial page for referral information. 

For more information on clinical trials, get in contact with our cancer clinical trials enquiry coordinator.

Clinical Trials Enquiry Coordinator

Business hours, Mon to Friday between 9am - 2pm
Email [email protected]
Phone (03) 8559 7456

Open and Recruiting Clinical Trials

A clinical trial to test the safety and effectiveness of the new treatments Durvalumab given with Oleclumab in combination with chemotherapy as a first treatment option for patients with microsatellite-stable colorectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body

Cancer type

Microsatellite-stable colorectal cancer

Status

Open and recruiting

Phase

1/2: A phase one / two clinical trial combines a phase one and two. The phase one tests new treatments sometimes for the first time in humans, usually in a small group of patients. The phase two part tests the new treatment in a larger group of patients with selected cancer types. The aim of a phase one / two is to find the best dose of the new treatment and see if it works against the cancer.

Brief summary

A clinical trial to test a number of new treatments (Durvalumab and Oleclumab) with available chemotherapy (FOLFOX and Bevacizumab) available for patients with colorectal cancer.

Durvalumab is a type of treatment called an anti-PD-1 antibody that works by stopping specific proteins that stop the body’s natural immune system from attacking cancer cells. Stopping these proteins is expected to help immune cells attack cancer cells. Oleclumab is a type of treatment called CD73 that works by helping the body’s immune system to function normally. Oleclumab is expected to help prevent the cancer from growing.

The aim of the clinical trial is to test if this new treatment combination given together with the current available chemotherapy is more effective in shrinking the cancer or stopping the cancer from growing.

Who can participate

Patients who:

  • Have cancer that has spread to other parts of the body
  • Have had treatment for their cancer but it has gotten worse or have not responded to treatment given for their cancer

Clinical trials can have restrictive criteria of who can and can’t participate, talk to your doctor if you are interested in this clinical trial.

A clinical trial to test the new treatment Gevokizumab in combination with other anti-cancer treatments already available to patients with colorectal cancer, gastroesophageal cancer and renal cell carcinoma

Cancer type

Colorectal cancer, gastroesophageal cancer and renal cell carcinoma

Status

Open and recruiting

Phase

One: A phase one clinical trial tests new treatments sometimes for the first time in humans, usually in a small group of patients. The aim of a phase one is to test the safety of the new treatment and find the best dose to give patients.

Brief summary

A clinical trial to find the best dose of new treatment Gevokizumab in combination with approved treatments already available to patients with colorectal cancer, gastroesophageal cancer and renal cell carcinoma. Gevokizumab is a type of treatment that works by reducing inflammation in the body. High levels of inflammation can allow cancer cells to grow and spread to other parts of the body. It is expected that by reducing inflammation, Gevokizumab will reduce the growth of cancer cells. The aim of the clinical trial is to test if this new treatment combination can shrink the cancer or stop the cancer from growing.

Who can participate

Patients who:

  • Have cancer that has spread to other parts of the body.

Clinical trials can have restrictive criteria of who can and can’t participate, talk to your doctor if you are interested in this clinical trial.

A clinical trial to test safety and effectiveness of the new treatment Encorafenib and Cetuximab given alone or in combination with chemotherapy in patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body

Cancer type

Colorectal cancer with specific changes in the genes of the cancer (BRAF V600E)

Status

Open and recruiting

Phase

Three: A phase three clinical trial follows a phase two, in a larger group of patients with specific cancer types. The aim of a phase three is to compare the new treatment to what is available for that cancer type.

Brief summary

The aim of the clinical trial is to test if Encorafenib and Cetuximab are safe and effective in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has specific changes in the genes of the cancer (BRAF V600E). BRAF V600 change can increase the growth and spread of cancer cells. The treatments Encorafenib and Cetuximab work by stopping certain genes in the cancer which can cause the cancer to grow. Patients on clinical trial will receive either of the following:

Arm 1: Ecorafenib given with Cetuximab

Arm 2: Ecorafenib given with Cetuximab and mFLOWFOX6

Arm 3: Ecorafenib given with Cetuximab and FLOFIRI

Arm 4: Chemotherapy (either mFLOWFOX6, FLOFIRI, FLOFOXIRI or CAPOX)

Who can participate

Patients who:

  • Have BRAF V600E changes in the genes of the cancer
  • Have cancer that has spread to other parts of the body

Clinical trials can have restrictive criteria of who can and can’t participate, talk to your doctor if you are interested in this clinical trial.