Cancer Surgery and Anaesthetic Trials

The Cancer Surgery and Anaesthetic Trials team test new and established surgical techniques and anaesthetic management to find out the best outcomes for patients undergoing cancer related surgery.

The purpose of these clinical trials are to improve patient peri-operative care, preventing infection, reducing pain and improving long term quality of life after surgery as well as improving survival outcomes.

If you would like to be considered for a clinical trial you will require a referral from your current treating team. Visit the Joining a Clinical Trial page for referral information. 

For more information on clinical trials, get in contact with our cancer clinical trials enquiry coordinator.

Clinical Trials Enquiry Coordinator

Business hours, Mon to Friday between 9am - 2pm
Email [email protected]
Phone (03) 8559 7456

Open and Recruiting Clinical Trials

The effect of perioperative ketamine on the risk of development of chronic post-surgical pain

Cancer Type

Not specific

Status

Open and recruiting

Brief summary

The aim of this study is to see if giving the drug Ketamine during surgery and for up to 3 days after reduces development of chronic post-surgical pain in patients having breast, chest or abdominal surgery. Participants are randomly assigned to receive either the drug ketamine or placebo (normal saline) during and after surgery. All participants:

  • Complete questionnaires prior to surgery and before discharge from hospital
  • Answer follow up questions over the phone 3 month and 1 year following surgery
  • Have information accessed regarding visits to their GP and any pain medication scripts needed postoperatively (if consenting)
Who can participate
  • Adult patients who:
  • Are having breast, chest or abdominal surgery  
  • Require a hospital stay of at least one night following surgery
  • Do not have a history of stroke, epilepsy or complex regional pain syndrome

Chewing gum versus ondansetron to treat postoperative nausea and vomiting in female patients after breast or laparoscopic surgery

Cancer Type

Not specific

Status

Open and recruiting

Brief summary

This study is comparing chewing gum and the medication ondansetron in treating nausea and vomiting after surgery. Participants receive a gas anaesthetic and specified anti-nausea medication during their surgery. Participants who experience nausea or vomiting within 2 hours after surgery are randomly assigned to receive either chewing gum or ondansetron. Additional anti-nausea medications are given to participants in either group if nausea persists. All participants complete questionnaires before surgery. Participants who experience nausea/vomiting also complete postop questionnaires.

Who can participate

Women who:

  • Are having breast or laparoscopic (key hole) surgery
  • Are able to chew gum
  • Are having a gas based general anaesthetic

Taxane-based chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy: a cohort study

Cancer type

Not specific

Status

Open and recruiting

Brief summary

The aim of this study is to identify the incidence and key risk factors of chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy associated with Taxane-based chemotherapy. Patients are contacted by phone to complete an assessment of neuropathy signs and symptoms and surveys assessing levels of sensory loss and pain due to neuropathy.

Who can participate

Any patients over 18 who:

  • Were previously treated for any cancer with the Taxane based chemotherapy agents Paclitaxel, Docetaxel or Cabazitaxel between the 12 month periods of Jan 2017 to Jan 2018.
  • Do not have any pre-existing diagnosis of peripheral nerve damage, including symptom of pain, sensory loss or decreased motor function.
  • Do not have progressive or end stage disease