Peter Mac is researching ways to help more people learn about the importance of exercise as part of their cancer care.

If the effects of exercise could be encapsulated in a pill, it would be demanded by cancer patients, prescribed by every doctor and subsidised by government.

Scientific evidence shows that people who exercise regularly experience fewer and/or less severe treatment-related adverse effects such as fatigue, physical declines, distress and worsening quality of life.

Cancer patients who exercise have better physical and mental wellbeing.

Unfortunately, people with cancer can’t ‘take’ an exercise pill, they have to actively ‘do’ exercise to reduce the number and severity of cancer-related side-effects.

Despite the potent effects exercise can have in cancer care, only 1 in 10 people exercise enough to experience significant health benefits. 

Peter Mac is researching ways to help more people learn about the importance of exercise as part of their cancer care. Cancer doctors and nurses are perfectly placed to provide people with evidence-based information and advice about how exercise could help them get through and recover from their treatments.

Rather than just telling people what they should do, we want to know what people want to hear from their doctors and nurses.

The research specifically asks what messages would encourage patients to exercise as part of their cancer care plan, when they’d have been most receptive to discussing exercise and the format that would best suit their needs.

This data will in turn help cancer doctors and nurses discuss exercise more effectively and help people have better access to information about exercise in a way that suits them. 

If you’ve started cancer treatment in the past 3 years we’re eager to hear what you think.  Your responses will be directly used to create tools and resources that help people reduce the side effects of cancer and its treatment.