Myelodysplastic Syndromes

Clinical trials for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). MDS are a group of cancers that affect the production of normal blood cells in the bone marrow.

If you would like to be considered for a clinical trial you will require a referral from your current treating team. Visit the Joining a Clinical Trial page for referral information. 

For more information on clinical trials, get in contact with our cancer clinical trials enquiry coordinator.

Clinical Trials Enquiry Coordinator

Business hours, Mon to Friday between 9am - 2pm
Email [email protected]
Phone (03) 8559 7456

Open and Recruiting Clinical Trials

A clinical trial to test if the treatments FT-2102 and Azacitadine are effective in controlling the diseases Acute Myeloid Leukaemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome in people who have a specific changes in the genes of the cancer (IDH 1)

Cancer type

Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML), Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS)

Status

Open and recruiting

Phase

One / two: A phase one / two clinical trial combines a phase one and two. The phase one tests new treatments sometimes for the first time in humans, usually in a small group of patients. The phase two part tests the new treatment in a larger group of patients with selected cancer types. The aim of a phase one / two is to find the best dose of the new treatment and see if it works against the cancer.

Brief summary

Patients will receive one of the following treatments:

  • FT-2102 alone
  • Azacitadine alone
  • FT-2102 and Azacitadine given together

This will depending on the patient’s previous treatments and the changes in the genes of the cancer.

Who can participate

Patients who:

  • Have Acute Myeloid Leukaemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome that has not responded to previous treatment
  • Specific changes in the genes of the cancer (IDH 1)

Clinical trials can have restrictive criteria of who can and can’t participate, talk to your doctor if you are interested in this clinical trial.

A clinical trial to test if giving Cyclophosphamide after transplant can prevent graft versus host disease and if this is better than the current standard treatment

Cancer type

Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML), Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL)

Status

Open and recruiting

Phase

One: A phase one clinical trial tests new treatments sometimes for the first time in humans, usually in a small group of patients. The aim of a phase one is to test the safety of the new treatment and find the best dose to give patients.

Brief summary

The clinical trial aims to find out if the treatment Cyclophosphamide is better than the current standard of care treatment at preventing graft versus host disease in patients who have just had a bone marrow transplant.

Who can participate

Patients who:

  • Aged 18-70 with AML or ALL which is in remission or MDS with <20% myeloblasts
  • Have a 6/6 matched sibling bone marrow donor

Clinical trials can have restrictive criteria of who can and can’t participate, talk to your doctor if you are interested in this clinical trial.